Menu
Home Page

Tuesday

Phonics

Say the alphabet using the picture below to help you. Can you name the five vowels?

 

 

Now, use the document below for your activity. Name the aliens by combining the graphemes at the bottom of the sheet to spell their names! 

English

Today we will be learning to write and ask questions.

 

Can you remember the questions in the story of 'The Little Red Hen'?. What did the Little Red Hen ask the animals to help her with? Say these aloud to an adult.

 

What words do questions begin with?

 

Questions often begin with the question words below:

What....?

When...?

Where..?

How......?

Why.....?

 

What is at the end of a question?

Questions always end with a question mark instead of a full stop. Can you show an adult your best question mark? Have a bit of practise if you are finding this tricky.

 

Now, you will need an adult or another child to help you with this activity. Your adult can choose to play either the Little Red Hen or another animal in the story. You are going to ask them questions relevant to their character and the storyline.

 

For example:

'Little Red Hen, how did you feel when the animals refused to help you?'. 

 

When you have practised asking them, write some of your best questions down using the correct question words and ensure that you include a question mark at the end!

Maths

Problem of the Day: Can you solve it? Send us your answer on Seesaw please. 

Today we are learning to explore difference by comparing measures of length and volume. 

 

Recap the previous lesson’s activities and that children were comparing different people’s/teams’ results.

 

Ask: How did we find the distance between two children’s beanbags?

Children say: We drew a line from one beanbag to the other, then measured how many metres long the line was. That was the difference.

 

Explain that instead of going outside again and measuring the distance, we can make a model or representation of the results. Show children a cube and explain that we will use one cube to represent one metre.

 

Ask: Child A threw their beanbag two metres. How many cubes will I use to represent Child A’s throw?

 

Child B threw their beanbag five metres. How do I represent that using cubes?

 

Make two blocks using concrete cubes, one to represent each throw and line them up next to each other. Explain that the two cubes are the same in both blocks and that the part where one block is longer than the other represents the difference. The second block is three cubes longer than the first block, so the difference in distance is three metres. Be sure to continually make connections between the cube representation and the concrete (“The five cubes represent the five metres that child A threw his beanbag”).

 

 

The next picture represents the same distance/difference on a number line. Discuss similarities and differences between the cube representation and the number line.

 

 

This picture below introduces the abstract equations 2 + c = 5 and 5 - 2 = c.  This introduces the idea that ‘difference’ can be found by ‘counting on’

(2 + c = 5 which is mirrored in the cube representation and the number line), but also by taking away what is common (I can subtract the 2 m because that was the same in both throws and that leaves 3 m difference).

 

 

Task 1

Prepare children’s beanbag data in advance to share. An example table can be found in the task sheet below.

Child chooses a beanbag throw to represent using cubes, explaining that one cube represents one metre of the throw.

Child does the same with another piece of throw data.

Child says what is the same about the two throws.

Child says what the difference is, describing this as the distance between their beanbags.

 

Recap the second activity from the previous day, showing children their water in measuring cylinders (or photos of them).

Show children then pictorial representation of the activity below which can be used to recap how the winner was decided. 

 

 

Ask: What is the difference between Team A and Team B’s volume?

 

Explain that, just like with the beanbags, we can make a model or representation of the results. Show children a cube and explain that we will use one cube to represent one unit of water.

Ask: Team A transferred three units of water. How many cubes will I use to represent Team A’s result?

 

Team B transferred seven units of water. How should I represent Team B’s result in cubes?

 

Make the two blocks using cubes and line them up next to each other. Explain that the three cubes are the same in both blocks and that the part where one block is longer than the other represents the difference. The second block is four cubes longer than the first block, so the difference in volume is four units. Be sure to continually make connections between the cube representation and the concrete (“The three cubes represent the three units of water that Team A transferred”).

 

The picture below shows the same difference on a number line. Discuss similarities and differences between the cube representation and the number line.

 

 

The next picture returns to the abstract equations 3 + c = 7 and 7 - 3 = c. As before, it should be explained that ‘difference’ can be found by ‘counting on’ (3 + c = 7 which is mirrored in the cube representation and the number line), but also by taking away what is common (I can subtract the 3 units because both teams transferred that amount of water, and that leaves four units’ difference).

 

 

Use the above learning to help you to attempt the challenges below. Use cubes to represent the volumes transferred by different teams and identify the difference between the volumes. If appropriate, they write abstract equations, and/or number line representations

Top